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Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)
, inside the michael jackson case." and aphrodite jones, author of "michael jackson conspiracy." plus lisa bloom, an anchor on the legal network in session. lisa, what do you believe are the biggest lessons we can learn from the michael jackson trial? >> i think there's no question that his celebrity status and what led to his acquittal in part. because we know from some of the jurors who were interviewed afterwards that back in the jury room during the deliberations some of the jurors said, we can't convict my michael. not my michael. my michael could not have done this. you know, we have celebrity culture in this country that's almost like royalty. there are certain people who are above the law, and i think in the michael jackson case, the celebrity status is what put it over the top. yes there were other factors, but none as big as the celebrity factor. >> but, aphrodite jones, i have to say i sat there along with you and diane ands conspiracy aspect of this case made my head explode. i couldn't make head or tails of it. they're keeping the whole family hostage. meanwhile they're gettin
unprecedented influence and impact and what comes next. suzy or monday, lisa ling and larry king weigh in. >>> also tonight, our 360 special investigation continues. "killings at the canal: the army tapes." what drove three sergeants to execute four iraqi men? did the army's own rules play a role? were those rules too strict? tonight you can decide for yourself. >>> later, "crime & punishment," a 15-year-old girl fights for her life after being gunned down. her agd attackers? five other teenagers. what is happening to our kids? >>> first you have, oprah winfrey's long good-bye began in the final ten minutes of her show. she will be ending her show in september of 2011. >> after much prayer and months of careful thought, i decided that next season, season 25 will be the last season of the ""oprah winfrey show."" and over the next couple of days, you may hear a lot of speculation in the press about why i am making this decision now. and that will mostly be conjecture. so i wanted you to hear this directly from me. >> winfrey said that 25 years felt like the right time to say good-bye. there
, it was an emotional scene in a florida courtroom on tuesday. lisa nowak, the astronaut who drove 1,000 miles from texas to florida to attack a romantic rival pled guilty, and then the judge made her turn around and apologize to her victim. she was then given a year's probation. we're going to get more details, coming up. >>> plus, tennis legend andre agassi spent years getting attention and trophies for his dazzling performances on the court, but lately, he's been making headlines for a different reason. a bombshell book is out in which he talks about using crystal meth, his doomed marriage to brooke shields, and the fact that he actually hates tennis with a "dark and secret passion." he's going to talk about all that this morning in his first live interview since all this came out. this is surprising. >> an amazing, amazing story. >>> plus, it is veterans day, as we know, and we have vets and members of the military on the plaza to see one of the biggest rock bands in the world, bon jovi. they're goin to be live in concert a little later on. can't wait for that. >>> but we begin in virginia wher
drama in the case of former nasa astronaut lisa nowak. she pleaded guilty on tuesday to attacking a romantic rival and came face to face with that rival in a -- rather a tearful victim. nbc's jeff rossen was in the courtroom. jeff, good morning. >> reporter: mhey, meredith, god morning to you. as we've seen time and time again, love triangles usually get messy and end pretty badly. this one was really messy and ended really badly. it made headlines three years ago. remember this story? this is the astronaut from nasa who drove across the country to attack a romantic rival, another woman who was dating the man that she was dating. well, after three years, she now admits, yes, i did it. she pled guilty. and in court yesterday, when she said to the judge, i want to apologize to the victim, the judge said, okay, turn around and do it to her face. >> i'm glad i got the opportunity to apologize to you, ms. shipman, in person. i am sincerely sorry for causing fear and misunderstanding and all of the intense public exposure that you have suffered. i hope very much that we can all move for
solution? give me a call. the number, 1-877-586-7297. straight out to my fantastic expert panel, lisa bloom, cnn legal analyst. we're delighted to have brian monroe, visiting professor, northwestern university madill school of journalism. and ken sealy, author of "face it and fix it," as well as tom ruskin former nypd investigator. but we begin with michelle sigona. michelle, what is the very latest? >> the very latest, jane, is more charges were supposed to come down today from investigators. but they're actually waiting until possibly later on this week to figure out which jurisdiction will in fact handle those charges. they're also waiting for the autopsy results to come back from shaniya. she is at the medical examiner's office right now. and they're still trying to piece together this puzzle, because what investigators do know is that when she was last seen one week ago, and that when she was coming out of the hotel in stanford, north carolina, she was alive at that point. so they're trying to put together that time line to figure out who killed her, when she was killed, when her body
what police think happened. abc's lisa fletcher in north dakota with the latest. good morning, lisa. >> reporter: good morning, robin. more than 10,000 people drive into water every year. and s many victims drown right in their own neighborhoods, leaving family and loved ones asking, how could something like this possibly happen? remembrances left by family and friends, who gather privately at the chilling scene. tire tracks from the jeep, the only evidence kyrstin gemar, ashley neufeld and afton williamson drove into the pond to their deaths. this stock pond, in daylight, seemingly harmless. any area with livestock, yuld have a pond like this? >> reporter: dug to hold water for cattle, ponds are usually 12 to 16 feet deep, with sleep, muddy sides. >> if a week started going into one of these embankments, would there be a way back out? >> no. >> reporter: a tiny camera captures the impossibly thick water. wh was the visibility like? >> zero visibility. >> reporter: what do you suspect happen? is it a situation by the time you realize you're in trouble, it's too late to get out of it
want to know just what caused this tragedy that is shaking a campus and a community. lisa fletcher has the latest from dickinson, north dakota. >> i'm kyrstin's father age today is probably the worst day of my life. >> reporter: the outpouring of grief rivaled only by the outpouring of support as this small campus bands together reacting to the shocking news, the tragic deaths of three college softball players. kyrstin gemar, afton williamson and ashley neufeld. >> they were really close. >> ashley loved this school and this was her family away from home. >> reporter: the three best friends went missing over the weekend. the only clue, a frantic distress call to a friend that abruptly cut out. police say the chilling call came from their sinking jeep. they were trapped inside. the friend called 911. police immediately put out a bulletin. >> please be on the lookout for a white 1997 jeep cherokee with california plates. the streak has possibly three female occupants. please check areas around water, dam, lakes and rivers. >> reporter: after nearly two days of massive searches police dis
investigative correspondent lisa myers has more on this story. hi, lisa. >> good morning, matt. this is all being driven by public outrage toward bailed-out banks, which in recent months have doubled credit card intestates for millions of americans. what congress is moving to do now would merely prevent further increases on most balances. it will not undo what has already happened. for months now, consumers have been outraged by unwelcomed credit card notices. ed niska just got the word that bailed-out citibank is doubling his rate to 30%. >> it does anger me, because here i am, a citizen, and i helped bail them out. >> reporter: hank parker just got his second interest rate increase this year from citi on the $3,500 he owes. >> i'm getting whacked for 30% on an interest rate? i just -- it just knocked me over. >> reporter: linda and jay gallagher had downsized so they could pay all their bills after their consulting business was hit hard by the economy. then, chase doubled the interest rate on their $5,000 credit card bill to 15%. >> it was an injustic it was a great injustice to us, who w
for the reality show jon and kate plus 8. and their marriage could also be officially over very soon. lisa bloom is in los angeles with the latest. lisa, good morning. >> good morning. well, jon dwos lynn brought a dozen red rowses to his weekend meeting with his estranged wife, kate. but it was all business. an arbitration hearing designed to bring them closer to divorce. >> sad it's cut short. it's too soon. >> reporter: kate gosselin is talking about her reality series, not her marriage. after meeting face to face with five hours this weekend, jon and kate have agreed on the fate of their eight. kate gets primary custody of the kids. they're hammering out thousand split their ace is the either, but neither wants alimony. a source close to kate tells "people" magazine kate is just relieve that had a very painful chapter of her wlf is nearly over. the finale of their series jon and kate plus 8 ends its run with a visit to a fire station and a farm as the paparazzis snap away. >> it's just a part of or life. >> reporter: for five years cameras captured the growing pains, but it was their marriag
's at the courthouse in missouri. our cnn legal analyst lisa bloom is going to be joining me and she's going to be filling us in on some of the legal perspectives here. this thing came out of the blue, didn't it, david? >> it sort of did, rick. we weren't expecting to see it happen the way it did. the jury had this case. they were back there deliberating. the judge called everyone back in and said we have a plea deal. heather ellis has to plead guilty to disturbing the peace and resisting arrest. the penalty is, she has to serve one year unsupervised probation. spend four days in county jail over the next year. and then she has to go through an anger management program of not less than two hours, plus pay for court costs. now, she seemed to be happy -- we, her attorney said they were sort of -- felt that was appropriate. the prosecutor said that this was appropriate for someone for a first-time offense. i spoke to heather about it. >> i didn't break line. she actually broke in front of us. we also found out that i was shoved first by the theresa kinder. we also found out i didn't yell or cur
co-pays and out of pocket expen expenses. lisa sylvester explains. >> reporter: for many u.s. workers, it's open enrollment time, when workers choose their company-sponsored health care plans for next year. what they're finding, many corporations have scaled back. workers will have to pay higher out-of-pocket a company that advises corporations on benefit plans four out of ten employers are raising workers' deductibles and co-payments next year. >> health care costs are still rising faster than pay, rising faster than profits, rising faster than almost any other input. and so those costs have to be shared. and one way to do that is to increase the out of pocket costs for people who use health care services. >> congress is debating a health care bill, but will it push down those rising costs that workers have to shell out? democrats think so. >> this is why this legislation is important. affordability for our middle class. it lowers cost for every patient, reigns in premiums, co-pays, and deductibles, limits out of pocket cost. >> reporter: but many americans are not persuaded that pre
. >> prosecutors for former astronaut lisa nowak say they are trying to score a plea deal. the rockville, maryland, native is eected in a florida court tomorrow. if a deal is reached, prosecutors say she may not get any jail time. back in february of 2007, nowak is accused of driving from houston to orlando in a disguise to go afro man particular rival colleen shipman. no back is now facing several federal charges, including burglary and attempted kidnapping. if a plea deal isn't reached, nowak could start trial as early as next month. >> former president bill clinton will be in d.c. today to meet with senate democrats to talk about the health care legislation there. officials say the former president is scheduled to speak during the democrats' weekly caucus. as president, clinton tried but failed to revamp the nation's health care system, you recall. now he's trying to help president obama and senate democrats get through the hurdles facing the health care initiative. >>> our time right now 5:37, 53 degrees. >>> still ahead, why the mayor is catching heat for a bicycle ride. >> plus, puppies resc
skidding. i am alison starling. 7:22 is lisa baden is off of this holiday. there is not a lot of traffic but we have a fog issue. this is 395 @ glebe road. this could cause problems if you are headed out to travel somewhere. you might be going to grandma's house today on this thanksgiving. >> the fog will be out there a while. temperatures cooled off last night and a light wind did not help. it is really socked in. on the 95 corridor, you will experience lots of fog. as we go through the morni, we are hopeful this will break. when it breaks, we could get some sunshine but then another system will move in. upper 50's 4 the highs today. the fog is low but the upper clouds are moving around so the fog could break. the twins are out of t east- northeast. they will pick up -- the winds are out of the east-northeast >> we will be right back. >>> the big story today is how a virginia couple crashed the white house state dinner. meanwhile, we are following a developing story in the district where two people were shot in the 700 block of harvard st. nw. we have no word on their condition. >>> fun
they say there's nothing out of line. here's lisa stark. >> reporter: in a washington, d.c. conference room, experts from around the country gathered to scour for even the smallest clues that the h1n1 vaccine is causing dangerous reactions. dr. bruce gellen is the government's point man for the vaccine and says of the millions who have received the vaccine so far there have been 302 reported side effects. >> mostly sore arms, malaise, fever, things like that. >> reporter: nothing that would raise a red flag to y, oh-oh, this vaccine may not be safe? >> we're looking hard. we have many different systems in place. so far we haven't seen anything that worries us. >> reporter: the government's massive surveillance effort involves cross-checking lists of those who have received the vaccine with any later reports of health problems. data will come from health records from the department of defense, veteran affairs, the indian health service, medicare. and even from private health care plans covering 20 million americans. doctors and the public can also report side effects to a government vaccine
ready for game day. >> reporter: while at u.s. airways hub in washington, lisa scott knows the routine well. what is the secret to staying sane if you're a flight attendant? >> yoga. lots of deep breaths. >> reporter: the airlines anticipate just under 2 million flyers to pass through all of the nation's airports today. but the busiest air travel days will be sunday and monday, with just over 2 million flyers each day. and 23 year veteran linwood harris know what they are thinking. >> thinking about the wonderful dinner at grandma's house and expectations of getting there on time and having their bag arrive with them as well. >> it's a family obligation. right? >> yeah. yeah! the heartland, going to be fun, going to be great. >> check in for your flight early and plan on arriving at the airport two hours ahead. >> reporter: the good news? thanksgiving 2009 looks to be knows and ice-free. >> weather is cooperating. passengers are moving well and flying is good. >> reporter: and that is what you want to hear, right? flying is good across the country. the key is going to be whether the ic
son todd, a and alice lost her son on flight 93. lisa dohan here she lost her husband navy captain robert dolan at the pentagon september 11th. deborah burlingame, i believe is here and she lost her brother, a pilot. also we are honored tim brown from the new york fire department is here. tim worked night after night on the rescue and recovery efforts of the world trade center. so, it's a privilege to have each of you with us today. on september 11th, 2001, our nation was attacked by a savage gang of terrorists, people who had previously stated as bin laden did, they were at war with the united states. their intent was to kill innocent americans and bring ruin to the united states. the death and destruction they caused in new york, washington, and pennsylvania was an act of war. at the time, that was crystal clear to us. if there is now among some folks in washington any confusion on that point, it's because time, i think, has dulled their memory or because other matters have clouded their judgment. but, the american people remember that day well. and they know that the facts have
a romantic rival is getting a year of probation as punishment. 46-year-old lisa nowak pleaded not guilty to burglary and battery. pleaded guilty, that is to say. she drove from houston to florida wearing a diaper to confront u.s. air force captain shipman after she found out she was dating the guy nowak was interested in. meanwhile, david letterman is ready to take the stand. halderman says he was just trying to sell a screen play to dave not shake him down. halderman's lawyer says the case should be dismissed and tried to do that yesterday in court. brian: sorry about the noise, but it wasn't us. today is veterans day. nothing symbolized freedom, independence, and democracy better than the american bald eagle. gretchen: and with us today is al, founder and president of the american eagle foundation. i have to speak up. and challenger, america's first free-flying trained bald eagle. i was so excited for this segment today, al. of course, we've all seen challenger fly over the baseball stadiums and such. but to think this baby eagle fell out of a nest. >> that's right. that's thousand sta
help lisa pfund says she never imagined her daed, amber, who was shot in the stomach, could be wounded while on a military base in her own cup. >> she said soldiers are supposed to help the other people. >> reporter: some of the relatives of the shooting victims have complained they haven't gotten enough information about the conditions of their loved one, but those who were brought here have been taken to a private area of the hospital. the hospital as a whole has been closed temporarily to the public. and very little information is coming out. we do understand that at least four of the shooting victims were in operating rooms last night and some are in critical care. harry? >> kelly cobiella in temple, thanks so much. we'll have a lot more on this story in just a little while. i want to go back to, no, get a check on our nation's weather. dave is standing by. >>> good morning. 14 minutes past the hour. let's see what's happening all across the country. most of the country looking picture perfect today weather-wise with the exception of the pacific northwest where we're seeing some ra
. there are right now five children of former senators who are serving -- one female, lisa murkowski, and four mills. over the course of history, there have been 45 parings of fathers and mostly sons. guest: i am glad to know that. i remember one special day that chris dodd was sworn in. he was my seatmate. great, great guy. just as he was to take his seat, they move to the chair out of the chamber that he was to sit in, and a move to another chair in the chamber, and he sat down and was announced that he was now occupying the chair of his late father, thomas dodd. the staff had found the chair and located it and i think it is stored somewhere, and they made it available to a crisp. there was a very sentimental moment. host: before we get back to calls, let me ask you this in question, the most momentous vote he cast in your -- you cast in your career? guest: my gosh. there was no so-called declaration of war speech. during that time -- host: first gulf war? guest: the gulf war is one i remember because of the trauma. i think we debated it over the weekend. there were no staff members on the floor.
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)